US Army: No regrets about sending civilians to Aleppo

On Aug. 6, the United States sent a battalion of special operations troops to Aleppo to assist the Syrian army, in what President Donald Trump has called an “unprecedented effort” to defeat Islamic State (IS) militants in the war-torn city.

The United States has not yet confirmed the presence of any American troops in the city, but U.S. officials have said the troops are based there and that the operation is focused on providing intelligence, intelligence support and logistical support.

It was unclear whether the troops were specifically targeting IS fighters or were part of a broader U.N.-brokered truce.

Trump announced the troop deployment after the U.K.-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said at least 1,000 civilians were killed in airstrikes and shelling.

The Pentagon on Tuesday also confirmed that the U,S.

and Russia have agreed on the deployment of the troops.

The deployment comes amid a heightened focus on the Syrian city by U.,S., Russia and Turkey.

U. S. officials said on Wednesday that a plan for a military mission in Syria is in place and will be announced soon.

The U.s. is also looking to send additional troops to the warring regions in eastern Syria, where it is not known whether U. and U. K. troops will be deployed.

“We have decided to deploy a battalion to Aleppo,” U. Sgt. Col. Steve Warren, a spokesman for the U the US.

Army, told reporters in the Pentagon.

“The battalion will be a limited deployment in the coming weeks, possibly weeks.”

A U. N.-broked truce was put in place after IS fighters captured much of the northern province of Aleppo in August, and the United Nations has called on the Assad regime to give up control over the city.

Russia, which backs the Assad government, has denied it is involved in the attack on the Ummayad military base in Aleppo.

The government, however, has said the Syrian government is fighting IS.

The White House has repeatedly warned that Russia will not abide by the U.-brooked truce unless it ends the siege of the eastern part of Aleppo.

Russia and Iran have also repeatedly accused the United Kingdom and the U.,S.

of aiding and abetting IS fighters.

Trump has also repeatedly expressed skepticism about the veracity of the Syrian war and said that he would like to see the U S. withdraw its troops from the country.

“It’s a very, very, difficult thing,” he told The Associated Press last week.

“I don’t want to see it fail, but I don’t think it can succeed.”

The U S has been a major donor to the Syrian conflict, providing tens of millions of dollars to the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, which has been accused of committing war crimes against the Syrian people.

The administration has also sought to ease the financial burden on the American taxpayer by saying it is “committed to reducing the U-S.

military footprint in Syria” as it seeks to end the fighting there.

U, S. military officials have previously said they are prepared to support U.k. forces to fight IS in Syria, but have not said how much support they will provide.

U S Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters Wednesday that “we are very pleased to see that the Russians and the Iranians have accepted the terms of the U .

“While we remain committed to defeating ISIL in Syria and elsewhere, the international community must remain united in fighting these terrorist groups.””

While we remain committed to defeating ISIL in Syria and elsewhere, the international community must remain united in fighting these terrorist groups.”

Ontario’s housing market ‘under siege’ by record debt burden

ONTARIO — Ontario’s housing stock is in “a complete state of siege” and it’s getting worse by the day, the head of the province’s housing regulator said Thursday.

The Ontario Association of Realtors is warning the provincial government that its current “housing affordability crisis” has “become more serious” and the situation is “getting worse by day.”

The association’s president, Michael A. Buss, said Ontario’s real estate market is on the verge of a historic correction that could wipe out all the gains Ontario made in the past decade, from the creation of the single-family home to the construction of the new high-rise condo tower.

“It’s just a total meltdown.

And we’re just witnessing it,” Buss said in an interview.

Ontarians are now paying about $7,500 more for a home than they did a decade ago, according to data released by the provincial housing agency last week.

That’s up nearly 14 per cent from the $6,600 average home price, according a report from the Ontario Association.

Buss said Ontario is still at a high point for home prices, but the province is not seeing the level of activity that it did a year ago.

There are fewer homes sold in the province, he said.

If that trend continues, Buss warned that the real estate industry will suffer a significant blow, adding that it would be “the equivalent of the whole economy collapsing.”

Ontians are now struggling with record debt levels, Bump said, adding he hopes the government will help the province.

I think that is a really big step for Ontario,” Bump told The Canadian Press.

However, he added that the government needs to work on addressing the issue of rising mortgage debt and finding a way to lower it while still making sure there is a safe and stable home market.

He said the government should also look at creating more affordable, high-quality housing in the Greater Toronto Area.

In addition to raising the minimum home price to $1 million, Bumps plan would see a 5 per cent increase in taxes on mortgage interest, an additional 2.5 per cent tax on capital gains and a 5.5-per-cent tax on real estate sales, all of which he said would help the housing sector.

A key to getting the debt under control is creating more housing, he argued.

It’s not a question of if, it’s when,” Bumps said.

“We’re going to have to do a better job of creating more homes in this country.

What we’re seeing right now is the housing market is under siege.

It’s just getting worse.”

Mortgage debt has reached record levels, with Ontario now sitting at $4.8 trillion, according the B.C. government.

For the first time in decades, Ontario has a debt-to-income ratio of nearly 300 per cent, with household debt at over 100 per cent of disposable income, according Buss.

Since 2011, the province has increased its mortgage interest rates, which were initially set at 1.25 per cent but have since risen to 2.75 per cent.

And in July, the Ontario government increased the maximum annual mortgage payment to $500,000 from $400,000, to help pay down debt.

This increase has been accompanied by an increase in interest rates on all mortgages, from 1.5 to 2 per cent over the last five years.

While Ontario’s current high-debt crisis is a crisis, Busters plan will likely help address some of the issues that are hurting Ontario, he noted.

We’re still in the middle of a housing crisis, and we have a long way to go,” Busters said.”

If we can’t get out of this, it could be a whole lot worse.