US Army: No regrets about sending civilians to Aleppo

On Aug. 6, the United States sent a battalion of special operations troops to Aleppo to assist the Syrian army, in what President Donald Trump has called an “unprecedented effort” to defeat Islamic State (IS) militants in the war-torn city.

The United States has not yet confirmed the presence of any American troops in the city, but U.S. officials have said the troops are based there and that the operation is focused on providing intelligence, intelligence support and logistical support.

It was unclear whether the troops were specifically targeting IS fighters or were part of a broader U.N.-brokered truce.

Trump announced the troop deployment after the U.K.-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said at least 1,000 civilians were killed in airstrikes and shelling.

The Pentagon on Tuesday also confirmed that the U,S.

and Russia have agreed on the deployment of the troops.

The deployment comes amid a heightened focus on the Syrian city by U.,S., Russia and Turkey.

U. S. officials said on Wednesday that a plan for a military mission in Syria is in place and will be announced soon.

The U.s. is also looking to send additional troops to the warring regions in eastern Syria, where it is not known whether U. and U. K. troops will be deployed.

“We have decided to deploy a battalion to Aleppo,” U. Sgt. Col. Steve Warren, a spokesman for the U the US.

Army, told reporters in the Pentagon.

“The battalion will be a limited deployment in the coming weeks, possibly weeks.”

A U. N.-broked truce was put in place after IS fighters captured much of the northern province of Aleppo in August, and the United Nations has called on the Assad regime to give up control over the city.

Russia, which backs the Assad government, has denied it is involved in the attack on the Ummayad military base in Aleppo.

The government, however, has said the Syrian government is fighting IS.

The White House has repeatedly warned that Russia will not abide by the U.-brooked truce unless it ends the siege of the eastern part of Aleppo.

Russia and Iran have also repeatedly accused the United Kingdom and the U.,S.

of aiding and abetting IS fighters.

Trump has also repeatedly expressed skepticism about the veracity of the Syrian war and said that he would like to see the U S. withdraw its troops from the country.

“It’s a very, very, difficult thing,” he told The Associated Press last week.

“I don’t want to see it fail, but I don’t think it can succeed.”

The U S has been a major donor to the Syrian conflict, providing tens of millions of dollars to the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, which has been accused of committing war crimes against the Syrian people.

The administration has also sought to ease the financial burden on the American taxpayer by saying it is “committed to reducing the U-S.

military footprint in Syria” as it seeks to end the fighting there.

U, S. military officials have previously said they are prepared to support U.k. forces to fight IS in Syria, but have not said how much support they will provide.

U S Secretary of State Rex Tillerson told reporters Wednesday that “we are very pleased to see that the Russians and the Iranians have accepted the terms of the U .

“While we remain committed to defeating ISIL in Syria and elsewhere, the international community must remain united in fighting these terrorist groups.””

While we remain committed to defeating ISIL in Syria and elsewhere, the international community must remain united in fighting these terrorist groups.”